"I Am Who I AM" - The Popeye Syndrome: 5 Keys to Interpersonal Success

"I am who I am."

I can still remember sitting in front of the TV after school watching my favorite spinach-eating character flexing his "musKles" and saving the day.

But, my perspective of Popeye's quote, "I am who I am" recently changed when I heard a client use the phrase to describe people who had no interest in adapting and no interest in working with others who were different from them. "I am who I am, and if you don't like me - who cares."

Tip #19: Engage in Conflict. You'll Save Time.

People often look to time management techniques when forced to do more with less. But, consider a different approach. Consider engaging in conflict to save time.

6 Ways to Continue Training When Budgets are Tight

When budgets are tight, training often gets reduced. But, what happens when the economy turns around (and it will!)? Will your people and your organization be poised for success?
For those companies with limited resources, here are some ideas on how to continue training:

Change – Get on board. The train is leaving.

I think one of the most important characteristics of successful leaders and people – regardless of their role – is that they embrace change.

It’s not good enough to just be comfortable with change. It’s not good enough to just recognize that change happens. That breeds complacency and comfort.

People who embrace change thrive on uncertainty. They do not need every detail to make decisions. You rarely hear them say, “as soon as (FILL IN THE BLANK) happens, I am going to (BE HAPPY, DO THIS, ACHIEVE THAT, FILL IN THE BLANK) .

Mattering or Marginalizing?

I recently learned a new concept from a colleague Amy Tolbert at ECCO International. Actually, it wasn't a new concept but it was just framed in a way that really resonated with me. It is called Mattering or Marginalizing.

Tip #18: How do you make someone feel like they matter?

  • Develop awareness of how you treat others. Our perceptions and biases are often so ingrained that we don't recognize how they impact our behaviors. Spend some time considering how you treat people who are different from you. Go beyond gender and ethnicity and consider how you treat others who are older, younger, with varying shapes and sizes, etc.
  • Involve others in solving problems and making decisions. Don't try to solve a front line problem without asking asking/involving someone who works on the front line.

Leadership: Long-term or Short-term Outlook Where You Work?

As I look at the business landscape today, I believe two types of companies are emerging – (1) those that choose to cut costs at all cost, and (2) those that recognize that people got us to where we are today and people will get us out of where we are today.

Self-awareness: The Essence of a People-First™ Leader

One of the most important characteristics of a People-First™ Leader is that they are self-aware.
Self-aware?
Here’s what I mean. (1) They understand why they respond to others the way they do, and (2) they understand why others respond to them the way they do.
Why is this important?

Meaningful Change: Ideas to stay on track, accountable, and focused

A few weeks ago, we had a follow-up workshop to our annual Create Yourself goal setting seminar. I was so inspired with how much progress people have made since that first session in mid-January. Several people have created financial plans, others have made steps toward a career transition, and one person has stopped smoking.

Now that's what I call timely and meaningful change.

During our follow-up session together, we brainstormed about ideas to stay on track, focused, and accountable throughout the year. I thought I would share those with you today.

That's Not Leadership!

I had just returned to my hotel room after a beautiful sunrise run in Washington D.C. where I am attending an Inscape Publishing conference. While enjoying a cup of post-run coffee, I read an article about a former NASA official (he served as the NASA Chief of Staff and as its liaison to the White House) who was “charged with using his government position to serve his own financial interest.” If convicted, he could face 15 years in prison.
That’s not leadership!

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