Clarity of Purpose

What is your team's purpose?

What is your team supposed to do that no other team does?

These are important questions for all teams - whether you belong to a management team, a functional team, a project team, or other.

The challenge in most organizations is that teams don't have clarity about their purpose. They brush it off as something too fluffy to consider. Or, for other teams, their purpose ends up on a pretty poster in a conference room and does nothing but take up wall space.

A Common Leader Mistake: Part 3

Another  common and costly leader mistake that can result in a loss of credibility and trust.

MISTAKE: Imposing goals on team members.

I can’t stress enough the importance of making the goal-setting process collaborative. Imposing individual goals on someone is the fastest way to lose commitment. And, leaders should be leery about imposing their expectations through online collaboration tools. Technology can be successfully used to support the goal-setting process, but should never take the place of crucial conversations.

A Common Leader Mistake: Part 2

Another  common and costly leader mistake that can result in a loss of credibility and trust...

MISTAKE: Leading by email (or by texting, project management tools, online chat, or other technology) instead of Leading by Example.

A Common Leader Mistake: Part 1

A common and costly leader mistake that can result in a loss of credibility and trust...

MISTAKE: Getting caught up in the Popeye Syndrome – “I am what I am.”

The implied message here is: “I am the way I am and if you don’t like it, who cares?”

Leaders often exhibit this behavior when doing things like conducting meetings without involving team members, and when resolving team member issues without asking for input or engaging them in the problem-solving process.

3 Ways to Derail Team Formation: Part 2

Here is the second excerpt from our recent article on 3 Ways to Derail Team Formation.

In Part 1 of this post I talked about the first mistake that derails team formation - Ambiguity of team purpose and vision for the future.

Here's Mistake #2...

Hiring a warm body instead of the right person

3 Ways to Derail Team Formation: Part 1

Below is an excerpt from our latest article 3 Ways to Derail Team Formation.

Most teams struggle to reach their highest levels of effectiveness because of their inability to cultivate the right team of people from the beginning. As a result, communication breakdowns, unnecessary conflict, and poor decision making leads to a loss of key opportunities.

It doesn’t have to be that way.

Contribute first

At the start of a recent leadership development program with a group of emerging leaders here in Denver, Colorado, I asked the group how they would know if the 9-month program would be successful.

What would success look like for them individually?

Here are some of their responses:

"Success is making a positive impact in the lives of our staff, clients and all members of our organization… empowering people."

"I measure my personal success through the accomplishments of my team."

Smothering feedback with positives

Don’t get me wrong, I don’t want you to be ruthless.

The challenge for most people is that they don’t want to hurt others’ feelings and in the process they provide feedback that is so fluffy that the true point is never stated.

This results in a lack of clarity of the message.

If you are going to sandwich your feedback with positives, make sure your constructive feedback is clear.

Crested Butte - A Memorable Fourth

I am off to one of my favorite places on earth today - Crested Butte. It's a stunning mountain town here in Colorado with the most amazing single track mountain biking trails, beautiful wild flowers, and plenty of room to breath.

I hope you get some time to play this weekend.

Happy 4th.

Sal

General Praise Creates Resentment

Here's a real life situation of a manager providing general praise to a team member.

Manager's email to team member:

"Good job Jordan. Keep up the good work!"

Team member's verbal response to the email:

"Shut up jack a$$. I'm not on your fifth grade soccer team. I'm a professional."

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