team building colorado

What Guides You? These Will Help...

December 21, 2011 -- Sal Silvester

Everything in life is a choice.

How do you make your choices? What are they based on?

When we are clear about what is most important to us, we can make choices that are aligned with what we want in our lives. Guiding principles help keep us focused throughout the year and give us a foundation to determine the choices we make every day. It is through those daily choices that we build our lives.

Here's a quick visualization exercise you can try to help you create your guiding principles. Journal about the following:

The Choices We Make Create the Life We Live

December 19, 2011 -- Sal Silvester

I wanted to share a quote from a book called The Rythm of Life by Matthew Kelly.

"Everything is a Choice. This is life’s greatest truth and its hardest lesson. It is a great truth because it reminds us of our power. Not power over others, but the often untapped power to be ourselves and to live the life we have imagined.”

He goes on to say that it’s a hard lesson because it causes us to realize that we have chosen the life we are living right now.

Collaboration Trumps Time Management

September 7, 2011 -- Sal Silvester

Collaboration trumps time management...every time.

We often seek to do things faster and better and as a result look for "time management" techniques for the answer.

The problem is that time management often results in us asking the wrong question - "How do we do what we are currently doing more efficiently?"

Instead...focus on working more effectively with others and you'll find yourself answering these types of questions:

Communicate What You Need

September 6, 2011 -- Sal Silvester

When people don't communicate what they need, it results in a lose-lose for themselves and others around them.

I recently experienced this in my personal life. I'd been traveling (mostly for fun and personal time off) several weeks in a row and my wife and I were invited on an out-of-town trip to the mountains with friends. I immediately said yes, because spending time with friends and family is one of my core guiding principles.

A Common Leader Mistake: Part 4

August 8, 2011 -- Sal Silvester

Another  common and costly leader mistake that can result in a loss of credibility and trust.

MISTAKE: Solving problems others should solve.

It’s not uncommon for new leaders to solve problems for their team members instead of helping them learn to do it on their own. For the overly controlling leader, you may find it faster to take care of it yourself than to take the time to teach.

For the less assertive leader, it might be easier to do it yourself so you can get around confronting an issue directly.

Clarity of Purpose

August 3, 2011 -- Sal Silvester

What is your team's purpose?

What is your team supposed to do that no other team does?

These are important questions for all teams - whether you belong to a management team, a functional team, a project team, or other.

The challenge in most organizations is that teams don't have clarity about their purpose. They brush it off as something too fluffy to consider. Or, for other teams, their purpose ends up on a pretty poster in a conference room and does nothing but take up wall space.

Are Your Working Relationships Not Working?

June 15, 2011 -- Sal Silvester

Having successful relationships in the workplace requires only three simple things:

  1. people who think exactly like you do.
  2. people who have the same exact needs as you.
  3. people who have a perfect history with you.

If you DON'T have these three things, then I'd consider you normal. And, if you do have these three things, they're likely to be accompanied by their three cousins -  groupthink, mediocrity, and stagnation.

5 Quick Communication Rules for All Leaders

June 6, 2011 -- Sal Silvester

Rule #1: Do not avoid the difficult conversations. Your people will know, and you'll lose credibility in their eyes.

Rule #2: Everything you communicate can be done in a way that maintains or enhances a team member's self-esteem.

Rule #3: Own your feedback. Stop saying "we" think and start saying "I" think.

Rule #4: Ask for input.

Rule #5: Communicate what you know and what you don't know.

More Thoughts

May 31, 2011 -- Sal Silvester

Hold each other accountable. Don't wait for the boss. It takes too long and generates politics.

Find your singularity of purpose. If you can't initially, raise it up a level.

What are you hoarding?

Time management should be more about what you will stop doing instead of doing what you currently do more efficiently.

Follow up, even if you don't observe the behaviors.

Why?

Did you do what you committed to doing in that meeting?

Step out of your comfort zone and into your learning zone, without overstepping.

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