The Reluctant New Manager: Part 3

In Parts 1 and 2, I focused on how new managers can begin to make the transition from being a team member to being in charge.

You got to know when to hold'em, know when to fold'em

I hear a lot about the importance of coaching in the workplace, and for the most part I agree that coaching an important aspect of every leader's role. In fact, as a leader, I think you should be spending 20-30% of
your time coaching your direct reports.

But my intent for this post isn't "how to" coach someone (that will come in a future post), but rather "when to" coach someone.

Would you work for You?

I was recently at a meeting with a group of Human Resource executives, and one of the HR Directors mentioned that her slogan for her supervisory training was “would you work for you?”

That is a great question to ask - regardless of whether you have the title of leader or not. There is a tremendous amount of research, supported by the Gallup Organization and others, that indicates that people don’t leave their organizations, they leave their managers.

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