leadership development boulder

5 Ways for Every Leader to be a Coach

September 9, 2011 -- Sal Silvester

The best leaders spend up to 20% of their time coaching their direct reports.

It's a responsibility that leaders all too often overlook as they get caught up in pressing matters, but nothing can be more important to the health and future of an organization.

Coaching others not only helps develop their skills, it frees leaders to focus on more strategic initiatives as their junior leaders develop. It also builds the bench strength of an organization to ensure a competitive advantage in years to come.

A Common Leader Mistake: Part 6

August 15, 2011 -- Sal Silvester

Another  common and costly leader mistake that can result in a loss of  credibility and trust.

MISTAKE: Drawing clear lines in the sand.

The challenge in many organizations is that most leaders don’t get to know their people well enough to create a motivating environment. They like to draw lines in the sand between business and personal.

Actually, our business and personal lives often intersect and have a huge impact on each other.We need to make business personal.

Clarity of Purpose

August 3, 2011 -- Sal Silvester

What is your team's purpose?

What is your team supposed to do that no other team does?

These are important questions for all teams - whether you belong to a management team, a functional team, a project team, or other.

The challenge in most organizations is that teams don't have clarity about their purpose. They brush it off as something too fluffy to consider. Or, for other teams, their purpose ends up on a pretty poster in a conference room and does nothing but take up wall space.

A Common Leader Mistake: Part 1

July 26, 2011 -- Sal Silvester

A common and costly leader mistake that can result in a loss of credibility and trust...

MISTAKE: Getting caught up in the Popeye Syndrome – “I am what I am.”

The implied message here is: “I am the way I am and if you don’t like it, who cares?”

Leaders often exhibit this behavior when doing things like conducting meetings without involving team members, and when resolving team member issues without asking for input or engaging them in the problem-solving process.

Contribute first

July 12, 2011 -- Sal Silvester

At the start of a recent leadership development program with a group of emerging leaders here in Denver, Colorado, I asked the group how they would know if the 9-month program would be successful.

What would success look like for them individually?

Here are some of their responses:

"Success is making a positive impact in the lives of our staff, clients and all members of our organization… empowering people."

"I measure my personal success through the accomplishments of my team."

Making Recognition Work for You: Part 2

April 28, 2011 -- Sal Silvester

The Manager who approached me in Part 1 of this series had used his original question of 'Sal, why do I have to give people recognition for doing their job?' to set me up.

He was persistent and continued, "I don't give people recognition for just doing their jobs. That's what they get paid for."

The conversation went on, and he justified his position of not giving people recognition by saying that he had high standards. Hmmm. High standards, I thought. What does that have to do with it?

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - leadership development boulder