Do Your Managers Coach?

managers should be coaches

If there’s one leadership skillset that differentiates good from great organizations, it’s the ability for your managers to be coaches. That’s precisely what today’s post is about. But to get there, managers have to recognize some of the common and costly challenges that often slow them down or stop them from coaching others.

Challenge #1: Problem solving is a problem. Managers are often great problem solvers, but the problem with problem solvers is that they don’t address issues until a problem rises to a certain level and grabs their attention. Coaching is less about problem solving and more about ongoing dialogue that helps people be successful before problems arise. So when leaders don’t address issues until they become problems, they miss out on great coaching opportunities.

Good-bye Annual Review: Agile Performance Management

no more performance reviews, agile

We all know that the annual performance review is going by the wayside. The cumbersome process leaves managers feeling drained and employees devalued. Let’s face it, this dreaded beast of a process provided little in the way of measurable results compared with the time and effort required. Even the stalwarts who set the annual review standard, such as General Electric, are changing their approach.

Accountability: Four Ways to Manage Team Expectations

Leaders get what they expect, and they get what they tolerate.

What are you tolerating? What are the low expectations that you are “putting up with” that shouldn’t be happening?

 

Maybe you’re telling yourself a story that allows you to tolerate unacceptable behaviors. “Well, I don’t have the skillset on my team to backfill for this person?” Or, “I need to choose my battles.” Or “It’s no big deal.” Or, “I’ll burn the relationship if I give her feedback.” How about this one - “I can’t hold her accountable for (fill in the blank) because she’s a good producer.”

 

 

Transitioning to Senior Leadership: From Task Manager to Champion

When we asked executive leaders to describe what effective senior leaders do, their responses centered around empowering people (versus micromanaging) and building others up. Here were a few of the raw comments from the executives we surveyed. 

The effective senior leader…

Transitioning to Senior Leadership: Allowing for Dialogue

In our last two posts we've focused on how to make the mindset shift from consensus or compliance (depending on your tendencies) to commitment. The first of three focus areas was to provide intentional and structured communication to help win the hearts and minds of your people. The second was explaining the Big Why

Allow for Dialogue

Transitioning to Senior Leadership: Explaining your Rationale

In our last post, we began the discussion on how to actually make the shift from consensus or compliance (depending on your tendencies) to commitment. The first of three focus areas was to provide intentional and structured communication to help win the hearts and minds of your people. 

The second, outlined here, is to explain "The Big Why." 

Have the Weird Conversations

Have you ever found yourself in a weird space at work - an awkward, strange, uncomfortable, how-did-this-happen kind of place? And then you just let it pass…and pass…and pass? 

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