The Global Leadership Team - Part 3

In the first of three posts about The Global Leadership Team, we talked about the importance of cultivating the team with agile leaders. Part 2 focused on creating the team's cultural building blocks. This post is focused on enhancing trust and respect among team members.

Building Trust and Respect Among Team Members

The Global Leadership Team - Part 2

In the first of three posts about The Global Leadership Team, we talked about the importance of cultivating the team with agile leaders. In this post we'll focus on the importance of creating the cultural building blocks.

Intentionally Creating the Team's Cultural Building Blocks

In our work with senior leadership teams, we typically start by helping the team put in place what we call the Cultural Building Blocks. These are the foundational components that enable a team to be successful - regardless of whether team members are co-located or global.

The Global Leadership Team - Part 1

Separated by time. Separated by distance. Separated by cultural differences.

Meet the global leadership team.

They are comprised of people living and working in various parts of the world. Sometimes all team members are remote. Usually some are co-located. The global leadership team faces many of the same challenges as a co-located leadership team, but require additional attention and intention to be successful. Consider these challenges that often derail global leadership team efforts.

Support, Don't Rescue

People are often promoted to positions of leadership because they were good at what they did technically - as a software developer, analyst, nurse, technician, etc.

The Middle Management Gap

They are sometimes viewed as "caught in the middle."

And for good reason. Senior leaders above them impose strategy that they are required to implement, and the team members who work for them look up for direction and support.

Meet the middle manager.

Now, most middle managers I know are enthusiastic, smart, and able, but there are several challenges that they face that usually go unseen.

Challenge 1: They are expected to rollout strategy without clarity of a clear vision and goals from senior leadership.

Where's the Vision?

I have written in the past about how "vision" often alludes leaders. "I'm not visionary" is something I often hear in my leadership development programs.

As a result, leaders often fail to create and communicate a vision and instead develop project plans and product road maps. These are important tools, but they are management tools. They are tools for controlling what is happening today. I don't know anyone who was ever inspired by a project plan or a product road map.

The Cost of Losing "Just" One Team Member

I am amazed at how many leaders don't know the cost of losing good people. They often only associate administrative costs, recruiting costs, and interviewing time toward the overall impact when a good person leaves.

The challenge is that the true costs are so much more.

Practice

A great way to develop as a leader is to practice. Yes, literally practice.

For example, if you have found that you struggle being courageous in meetings, find some low risk opportunities to speak up. Practice.

Or, if you just go along for the sake of getting along, find a low risk opportunity to challenge the status quo. Practice.

Or, if you doubt yourself and defer to others, sit up straight and look the part unit there is no doubt. Practice.

"Just Getting Through the Day"

"I spend so much time just getting through the day and don't have time to think about long-term planning."

This is a common statement I hear in my leadership development coaching sessions. The challenge is that what got you here as a leader, won't get you to the next level of leadership.

Here are a few ideas to help you transition into your role.

Leadership Competencies and Capacities (Part 5)

In this series of posts, we have been exploring leadership development from two perspectives – competencies and capacities. In our last two posts, we focused on the limiting internal belief of Controlling and Protecting. Today, our focus is on Complying.

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