Would You Work for You?

Have you ever respected any leaders whose words did not match their actions? Have you ever had respect for a leader who preached personal values, yet behaved differently?

The fundamental component of People-First Leadership™ is to Lead by Example. This is the core  — the component that will either establish your credibility or kill it. Just remember: Lack of credibility will prevent you from earning commitment and trust from your team members. Without that, there is no leadership.

Team in Name Only? Or Real Team

Team in Name Only

  • Unclear purpose, unclear agenda
  • Individual egos, goals, and silos first
  • Fear of debate, how others will react
  • Meetings are a distraction from "real work"
  • Avoid your peers
  • Rely on leader to integrate, accountability

Real Team

5 Quick Communication Rules for All Leaders

Rule #1: Do not avoid the difficult conversations. Your people will know, and you'll lose credibility in their eyes.

Rule #2: Everything you communicate can be done in a way that maintains or enhances a team member's self-esteem.

Rule #3: Own your feedback. Stop saying "we" think and start saying "I" think.

Rule #4: Ask for input.

Rule #5: Communicate what you know and what you don't know.

What Will You Stop Doing? (Part 2)

In a recent blog post I stated that the number 1 reason why senior leadership teams aren't more strategically focused is....

"There isn't enough time."

And, you'll know your team isn't strategically focused if you spend the majority of your time doing what I call the "Round Robin" - where you go around the conference room table and everyone gives an update about their area that almost no one else cares about.

Just Ask...

Have you ever wondered what is motivating to your people?

It's important to know, because as leaders, we need to tailor everything we do based on our team members' preferences and priorities.

I was in a team building workshop last week, and one of my participants asked, "...but how do we know what motivates our team members?"

I simply replied, "Just ask."

Here are some questions you might ask your team members and co-workers to better understand their needs and aspirations.

1. What two or three aspects of your work do you enjoy most?

What Stifles Conflict in Your Organization?

Healthy conflict. Dialogue. Debate. Too often teams avoid it.

Why?

Here are three reasons.

Making Recognition Work for You: Part 4

This is the fourth post in a 4-Part series. To get the scoop in why recognition is important, see Part 1. To understand some of the myths about recognition, see Part 2. To learn about the 4-level framework for a recognition program, see Part 3.

Making Recognition Work for You: Part 3

In Part 1 of this series we talked about the "case" for recognition. In Part 2, we have debunked some of the myths around recognition, the next steps are to put a framework in place for an effective recognition program.

In The Carrot Principle, the authors outline a four-level approach to recognition that is straight forward and easy to implement.

Making Recognition Work for You: Part 2

The Manager who approached me in Part 1 of this series had used his original question of 'Sal, why do I have to give people recognition for doing their job?' to set me up.

He was persistent and continued, "I don't give people recognition for just doing their jobs. That's what they get paid for."

The conversation went on, and he justified his position of not giving people recognition by saying that he had high standards. Hmmm. High standards, I thought. What does that have to do with it?

Overcoming Challenges on Remote Teams: Part 4

The last three posts have been focused on overcoming challenges encountered on remote teams. Part 1 was focused on getting your virtual team aligned, Part 2 on building cohesion, and Part 3 on creating disciplined team processes.

Today's post is focused on remote team leadership.

Pages