Coaching Your High Potential People (A Players)

Audrey works as a software engineer in a fast growing technology company in Denver. She’s young, smart, and a rising star on her team. She’s got a great attitude that is equally matched with performance. You might call her a “high potential” team member or even an “A” player.

Assess Performance, Then Coach

assess your people, then provide leadership coachingDo you want to make your coaching efforts more effective? If so, you'll need to be able to measurably assess your people.

How to Structure Your 1-1 Coaching Sessions

As we wind down the year and look toward the next, there isn't a better time to step up and engage more effectively with your people. One the simplest and most overlooked tools that leaders have to enhance their coaching is the 1-1 Coaching Session. 

What Great Mentors Do

The word “mentor” is used in a variety of contexts in today’s workplace. Sometimes it refers to a senior person who formally or informally provides guidance and advice to a junior team member. At times it refers to a team member’s direct manager who is partially responsible for his or her career development. In some organizations, mentors are formally paired with a mentee. In others, mentors are simply sought after by an eager team member looking to grow. A quick search on defines the word mentor as “a wise and trusted counselor or teacher; an influential senior sponsor or supporter.”

The Yes And Myth

leadership communication - using yes and

The latest workplace communication craze called "Yes and" has recently been popularized by team builders and improv folks who've never stepped into the business board room. It's a technique that minimizes disagreement and encourages agreement. So, instead of responding to a team member's idea with a "No" or a "But," people are trained to respond with a "Yes and…."

Arrogance Disguised as Selflessness

a leader without followers - leadership development colorado

Imagine this

A new Vice President joins your organization from a similar company in the same industry. Only his former company is bigger and arguably more successful. The leader has a grand vision that if implemented will have a significant impact on the company's end customers and shareholder value. He comes in blazing and doesn't just want to move the chairs on the deck, but wants to shift the direction of the boat. 

Shift 1 to Senior Leadership: Part 4

leadership and emotional intelligenceIn the past 3 posts I've made the case that the most important mindset shift a leader has to make to be successful in a senior leader role is to make the shift from being Smart to being Aware

Shift 1 to Senior Leadership: Part 3

The leadership downward spiralIf you missed Part 1 and Part 2, read those first. Then come back here for more details on the shift from being Smart to being Aware.

Shift 1 to Senior Leadership: Part 2

In our last post, we began exploring the first shift leaders need to make to be successful in senior leadership roles - from being smart to being aware.  

So, what does this shift of being smart to being aware look like? It will seem easy on the surface, but it's a lifetime of work. And it’s comprised of 3 parts: